Pentagon Forms Task Force to Accelerate Weapons Supply to Asia and Europe

The new body of the Pentagon is co-chaired by two undersecretaries of defense, in addition to representatives of the military institution, responsible for providing various services.

  • The American-made High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS).

The Pentagon has set up a special task force – the “Tiger team” – to facilitate arms sales to Washington’s allies, according to a senior US defense official. the wall street journal.

The force was formed in August and its main task is to expedite the process of delivering US-made weapons to foreign entities, according to the outlet in a Friday report.

The new body of the Pentagon is co-chaired by two undersecretaries of defense, in addition to representatives of the military institution, responsible for providing various services.

“It’s about the mechanical steps in the process,” the official told the WSJ. “How can we do a better job of eliminating inefficiencies in the system that will apply to all countries we work with?”

The source revealed that the team was launched due to growing tensions with China over Taiwan, in addition to the urge to send more weapons to Europe. The arsenals of Washington’s European allies have, by and large, been depleted due to the reckless supply of arms to Ukraine.

Read more: Pentagon signs $182 million contract for 3 NASAMS systems for Ukraine

“The long-standing argument for American gear is that it’s the best — and it’s the best,” an official said. “That also makes it the most expensive, it’s not cheap.”

Earlier in the day on Saturday, the Biden administration announced the sale of arms worth $1.1 billion to Taiwan.

Washington sees the convoluted arms shipment approval process has disadvantaged the United States by knocking China (and Russia) out of its seat as a rising power. Arms sales are executed by the Pentagon and the State Department and require the approval of the US Congress.

“This slowness may leave some countries uncertain if the United States really wants them as partners and risks sending countries with which the United States wants to stay close elsewhere to buy weapons,” the outlet said.

Former U.S. Navy Secretary Richard Spencer applauded the situation, decrying the diplomatic obstacles that have hampered arms flows from Washington to the world: “The building must become more agile. We are ossified, we are arthritic, we have to get over it,” he said.

However, despite this decision, one reality haunts the United States at home: Washington itself is suffering from a shortage of weapons and ammunition due to its fueling of the war in Ukraine, according to the WSJ.

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